ideas


At JOYCE we celebrate people. We stand proud with LGBTQIA+ and we celebrate your courage, creativity, and will to change the world. We are inspired by the curious men and unique women that have kicked the door wide open for gay rights, gender equity, and marriage equality for all people. Whether you are she, he, they, them, or none of them, you can be real with JOYCE. Because JOYCE thinks the real you is JUST RIGHT.

 

 

— 1950

HARRY HAY

Started the Mattachine Society, the country’s first successful gay liberation organization. Harry’s ideas would become the guiding principles of the US gay rights movement.

 

 

— 1960

CRAIG RODWELL

1965, he helped organize in New York and Washington DC the first public demonstrations of gay and lesbian activists.  Founded the Oscar Wilde Memorial Bookshop, the first store in the U.S. devoted to the sale of LGBT-related books; for decades it was located on Christopher Street in Greenwich Village, not far from the site of the Stonewall Inn.

 

 

— 1969

STONEWALL RIOTS

The spark that began the Gay Liberation Movement across the world.

 

 

— 1970s

SYLVIA RIVERA

Loud and persistent voice for the rights of people of color and low-income queers and trans people. Founded STAR (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries) and opened a shelter for homeless transgender youth.

 

 

BRENDA HOWARD

Organized the very first pride parade in 1970 after the Stonewall riots. Started the New York Area Bisexual Network in 1988, an organization that, to this day, serves as a central communication hub for bisexual and bi-friendly groups in New York City and the tri-state area. She successfully lobbied for the inclusion of bisexuality in the 1993 March on Washington, at a time when the movement was focused primarily on gay men and lesbians.

 

 

CHRISTINE JORGENSEN

After completing sex-reassignment surgery, Jorgensen herself acknowledged how revolutionary her case was, saying, “we didn’t start the sexual revolution, but I think we gave it a good kick in the pants!”

 

 

HARVEY MILK

First openly gay elected official in the history of California, where he was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.

 

 

BARBARA GITTINGS

In the 1970s, she was a prominent member of the American Psychiatric Association’s fight to get homosexuality removed from the list of psychiatric disorders.

 

 

GILBERT BAKER

Designed the flag that became widely associated with LGBT rights causes, a symbol of gay pride that has become ubiquitous in the decades since its debut. California state senator Scott Wiener said Baker “helped define the modern LGBT movement”.

 

 

AUDRE LORDE

Her writings covered everything from civil rights and sexuality. From 1991 until her death a year later, Lorde was the New York State Poet Laureate.

 

 

BARBARA SMITH

Inspired by Audre Lorde, she founded the Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press, the first U.S. publisher by, for, and about women of color.

 

 

JOEY JOLEEN MATAELE

An activist for the rights of transgender women from Tonga. She founded the Miss Galaxy Queen Pageant to celebrate the LGBTQI community in her home, Tonga. She is also the executive director of the Tonga Leitis Association.

 

 

LYNN CONWAY

An accomplished engineer who worked at IBM, and fired for expressing her desire to transition to female. She lobbied to include protections for transgender people in company’s code of ethics.

 

 

RICHARD ISAY

A psychoanalyst, psychiatrist, and gay activist who is credited with changing the way psychoanalysts view homosexuality.

 

 

MIRIAM MARTINHO

One of the leading feminists in Brazil and part of the second generation of feminist journalists, who emerged in the 1980s. She was one of the first people to bring lesbianism openly into the fold of feminism and founded one of the first Lesbian-Feminist organizations in the country.

 

 

MARTINA NAVRATILOVA

Openly gay American Tennis champion selected as TENNIS magazine’s greatest player from years 1965-2005.